Is student loan dischargeable in a Chapter 13?


Student loans are typically non-dischargeable in either a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy or in a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. (In some instances, an individual can have his/her student loans discharged in a bankruptcy if the individual can show the student loans present an undue hardship. The standard for this is very high and very few individuals are able to successfully show this.)

A Chapter 13 is essentially a repayment plan where the individuals pay back their creditors based upon their income. Some people will pay the creditors 1% of what is owed to them and some will pay back 100%. The amount paid back will depend on a person’s individual circumstances. If a person owes student loans in a Chapter 13, the student loans will survive the bankruptcy and essentially be waiting for the debtor at the completion of the Chapter 13.

While the individual is in a bankruptcy, the student loan company will be treated like any other unsecured creditor if it is put into the plan. The student will only get a portion of the Chapter 13 payment if they get anything at all. The debtor will still owe the student loan company whatever has not been paid upon the completion of the bankruptcy.

If a student loan is considered long-term debt, meaning that the individual will be paying on the student loan for longer than the duration of the Chapter 13 plan even if the individual were making full payment to the student loan company, then it is permissible to allow the debtor to continue to pay the student loan company directly while the person is in the Chapter 13. In many cases, this will be a benefit to the debtor because the student loan company will be paid more during the Chapter 13 plan and the debtor will therefore owe them less when the Chapter 13 plan is completed.

Student loans are typically non-dischargeable in either a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy or in a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. (In some instances, an individual can have his/her student loans discharged in a bankruptcy if the individual can show the student loans present an undue hardship. The standard for this is very high and very few individuals are able to successfully show this.)

A Chapter 13 is essentially a repayment plan where the individuals pay back their creditors based upon their income. Some people will pay the creditors 1% of what is owed to them and some will pay back 100%. The amount paid back will depend on a person’s individual circumstances. If a person owes student loans in a Chapter 13, the student loans will survive the bankruptcy and essentially be waiting for the debtor at the completion of the Chapter 13.

While the individual is in a bankruptcy, the student loan company will be treated like any other unsecured creditor if it is put into the plan. The student will only get a portion of the Chapter 13 payment if they get anything at all. The debtor will still owe the student loan company whatever has not been paid upon the completion of the bankruptcy.

If a student loan is considered long-term debt, meaning that the individual will be paying on the student loan for longer than the duration of the Chapter 13 plan even if the individual were making full payment to the student loan company, then it is permissible to allow the debtor to continue to pay the student loan company directly while the person is in the Chapter 13. In many cases, this will be a benefit to the debtor because the student loan company will be paid more during the Chapter 13 plan and the debtor will therefore owe them less when the Chapter 13 plan is completed.

Written by Hoglund Law

The attorneys of Hoglund law are licensed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio. Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC is based in Roseville, Minnesota. In addition to handling cases involving bankruptcy & social security, Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC handles faulty drugs and toxic exposure.

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