Video – Mesothelioma: What Is It?

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Written by Andrew Kinney

Andrew Kinney is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and Marquette Law School. He is in his 25th year of practice in Social Security Disability law. He speaks nationally on Social Security Disability practice, founded the Minnesota State Bar "Social Security Disability Section," and is an editor of the Social Security Pratice Guide, a five-volume legal guide published by LexisNexis.

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Video – Are You a Veteran Diagnosed with Mesothelioma?

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Written by Andrew Kinney

Andrew Kinney is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and Marquette Law School. He is in his 25th year of practice in Social Security Disability law. He speaks nationally on Social Security Disability practice, founded the Minnesota State Bar "Social Security Disability Section," and is an editor of the Social Security Pratice Guide, a five-volume legal guide published by LexisNexis.

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Compassionate Allowance Diseases: Ataxia-telangiectasia

 

The Social Security Administration established the Compassionate Allowances program in an attempt to expedite cases where individuals have medical conditions that are very severe and would qualify under one of the listings. However, not all diseases are met under a specific listing, but still may be approved under the CAL.

Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare inherited disorder that affects the nervous system, immune system, and other body systems.[1] People with ataxia-telangiectasia often have a weakened immune system, many develop chronic lung infections, have an increased risk of developing cancer, particularly cancer of blood-forming cells (leukemia) and cancer of immune system cells (lymphoma).[2] Affected individuals are very sensitive to the effects of radiation exposure, including medical x-rays, and the life expectancy of people with ataxia-telangiectasia varies greatly, but affected individuals typically live into early adulthood.[3]

Since individuals with A-T do have a weakened immune system, they are susceptible to recurrent respiratory infections.[4] Other features of the disease may include mild diabetes mellitus, premature graying of the hair, difficulty swallowing, and delayed physical and sexual development.[5] There is neither a cure for A-T nor is there a specific therapy for the neurological problems associated with the disease, however nobody has yet shown in a convincing way that physical therapy or specific nutritional supplements have helped, though there are many proponents of these approaches.[6]

For proper evaluation, Social Security recommends a sequence analysis of the ATM gene, because if it has identified mutations in both alleles in the proband, then the diagnosis of A-T is confirmed.[7] Ataxia-telangiectasia meets listing 11.17A, Degenerative disease not listed elsewhere.[8]

[1] https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/ataxia-telangiectasia

[2] Id.

[3] Id.

[4] https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/ataxia-fact-sheet

[5] Id.

[6] https://primaryimmune.org/about-primary-immunodeficiencies/specific-disease-types/ataxia-telangiectasia/

[7] https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0423022360

[8] Id.

Written by Hoglund Law

The attorneys of Hoglund law are licensed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio. Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC is based in Roseville, Minnesota. In addition to handling cases involving bankruptcy & social security, Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC handles faulty drugs and toxic exposure.

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Compassionate Allowance Diseases: Stiff Person Syndrome

The Social Security Administration established the Compassionate Allowances program in an attempt to expedite cases where individuals have medical conditions that are very severe and would qualify under one of the listings. However, not all diseases are met under a specific listing, but still may be approved under the CAL.

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare disease of the nervous system.[1] Progressively severe muscle stiffness typically develops in the spine and lower extremities; often beginning very subtly during a period of emotional stress.[2] Most patients experience painful episodic muscle spasms that are triggered by sudden stimuli.[3] Clinically, stiff person syndrome is characterized by muscle rigidity that waxes and wanes with concurrent spasms.[4] Treatment with IVIg, anti-anxiety drugs, muscle relaxants, anti-convulsants, and pain relievers will improve the symptoms of SPS, but will not cure the disorder.[5]  Most individuals with SPS have frequent falls and because they lack the normal defensive reflexes; injuries can be severe.[6]

Social Security recommends that in order for Stiff Person Syndrome to be properly evaluated an EMG and special anti-body testing should be performed, as well as a clinical history and examination that describes the diagnostic features of the impairment, progression of neurological symptoms, response to medication, and evaluative tests that rule out other causes of stiffness.[7]

Stiff person disease medically equals Listing 11.04B under Central nervous system vascular accident, and 11.06 Parkinsonian Syndrome.[8]

 

[1] www.hopkinsmedicine.org/neurology_neurosurgery/centers_clinics/neuroimmunology_and_neurological_infections/conditions/stiff_person_syndrome.html

[2] Id.

[3] Id.

[4] Duddy ME, Baker MR. Stiff person syndrome. Front Neurol Neurosci. 2009;26:147-65

[5] https://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/stiffperson/stiffperson.htm

[6] Id.

[7] https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0423022905

[8] Id.

Written by Hoglund Law

The attorneys of Hoglund law are licensed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio. Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC is based in Roseville, Minnesota. In addition to handling cases involving bankruptcy & social security, Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC handles faulty drugs and toxic exposure.

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Spina Bifida in Children

If your child has marked physical functioning due to their spina bifida, they may qualify for Social Security Disability. Spina bifida is a condition that is usually discovered at birth, where the backbone and membranes around the spinal cord are not fully developed. It may be as slight as a dimple or swelling on the child’s back, or as noticeable as an open wound on the back where the spinal cord protrudes out.

Recently I represented a child who had this condition, and required surgical correction, repairing the tethered spinal cord, but leaving a lipoma, or lump, around the vertebrae. Despite having this surgery, he still has some issues with his physical ability to walk and move around, and he also has severe issues in regards to his bladder control, which requires special accommodations from his school so he can excuse himself as needed from class. He also experiences chronic back pain which interferes with his daily activities.

In this specific case, the judge considered whether or not the child’s condition met a Listed Impairment, which would qualify the child for disability. The specific listing used was 111.08, Meningomyelocele, so Social Security would consider whether the child has a diagnosis related to spina bifida which includes spina bifida occulta, meningocele, or myelomeningocele. Then, they would look at evidence that shows the child’s impaired motor function, low IQ score, involvement with upper and lower extremities, and other neurological functioning including bowel & bladder control.

If Social Security finds that the condition isn’t severe enough to meet the requirements of the listed impairment, then they need to consider whether his functioning is decreased in the following areas: acquiring and using information, attending and completing tasks, interacting and relating with others, moving about and manipulating objects, caring for self, and health and physical well-being. The child would be found disabled if they find that their functioning is marked, which means a noticeable and severe decrease in their abilities.

Written by Hoglund Law

The attorneys of Hoglund law are licensed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio. Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC is based in Roseville, Minnesota. In addition to handling cases involving bankruptcy & social security, Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC handles faulty drugs and toxic exposure.

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Welcome to the Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC Blog

Welcome to hoglundlaw.com. We will soon have useful information available regarding Bankruptcy, Social Security, Debtor Education, and Mass Torts. In the meantime,  feel free to browse our website to learn about our areas of practice. To learn how Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik PLLC can best assist you, give us a call at 1-800-850-7867.

Written by Hoglund Law

The attorneys of Hoglund law are licensed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio. Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC is based in Roseville, Minnesota. In addition to handling cases involving bankruptcy & social security, Hoglund, Chwialkowski & Mrozik, PLLC handles faulty drugs and toxic exposure.

View all author posts →